Randy Ferrance, DC MD, bridging the gap between chiropractic and medicine

Podcast with chiropractor medical doctor who bridges the gap between the two professions

Dr. Randy Ferrance is a medical physician who was a practicing chiropractor when he entered medical school. Raised in an evangelical chiropractic family, he wasn’t vaccinated as a child. He speaks on bridging the gap from chiropractic to medicine, on his experiences making the transition from chiropractic to medicine and on how chiropractors can best develop working relationships with medical doctors.

Does Dr. Ferrance experience prejudice for being a chiropractor/medical doctor? Yes…but it’s not from whom you’d think.

Interview conducted with Dr. Brett L. Kinsler.

Get the podcast here or look for OnTheOtherHand Podcast on iTunes.

This podcast episode was sponsored by XSite Pro website design and management software. The software I use for my own office website.  Try their software with a 30 day money back guarantee.

Edzard Ernst, CAM Critic, Talks with Dr. Brett Kinsler on Chiropractic and Bias

Book by Edzard Ernst complementary and alternative medicine

Professor Edzard Ernst, MD, PhD, FRCP, FRCP holds the Laing Chair in Complementary Medicine at the Peninsula Medical School, University of Exeter and is the Editor-in-Chief of two medical journals. He has also been seen as a major public opponent of chiropractic and alternative medicine. He has devoted most of his career to publishing articles that are critical of complementary and alternative medicine….an unbelievable number of papers. Like 1500 or so. He’s been especially critical of chiropractic and, in the opinion of many researchers, has glossed over important research and exaggerated results. To me, what’s most interesting about Ernst is that he claims objectivity and lack of agenda. This podcast asks some tough questions of Prof. Ernst.

You can get the podcast episode on iTunes by searching the podcast section for “On The Other Hand” or you can just click here.

Thanks to this episode’s sponsor: Audible.com, the audiobook company. Get a free audiobook download just by trying their service free for 14 days.

Is Warren Hammer a Fasciaist?

Fascia is the newest focus in manual medicine. Those fibrous sheets that surround muscle are proving to be the link to all sorts of musculoskeletal problems. In this podcast episode, I interviewed one of the foremost experts on soft tissue manipulation who is bringing some groundbreaking techniques on fascial manipulation to the United States for the first time.

Excited about his recent work with well-known Italian physical therapist Luigi Stecco, Dr. Warren Hammer brings his 50 year experience in chiropractic and soft tissue procedures to his candid talk with me on our On The Other Hand podcast.

The episode can be found on iTunes or here.

Think you know all about chiropractors? Think again.

 

Interview published on the On The Other Hand podcast series by Rochester, NY chiropractor Dr. Brett L. Kinsler.

Hopsital Based Chiropractor Ian Paskowski on the Podcast!

Ian Paskowski, DC is the medical director of the medical spine care program at Jordan Hospital.  In this episode of On The Other Hand, he discusses delivering high quality spine care in a community based hospital and the future of this type of multi-disciplinary program.  He stresses that the program’s success hinges on patient centered care and in following the NCQA Back Pain Recognition Program guidelines as well as implementing best practices from the medical literature.  Practicing in an environment where medical specialties work together and chiropractors act in back pain triage has proven itself successful for Dr. Paskowski and his medical back pain program.

Find the podcast on iTunes or wherever fine evidence influenced podcasts are offered.  Direct link.

Podcast interview conducted by me, Dr. Brett L. Kinsler, skeptical Rochester chiropractor, blogger and one generally curious cat.

BMJ Writer Discovers Head Up Ass

photo of a kid on the beach with a clenched fist and the caption "I hate sandcastles."

John C. McLachlan is a professor of medical education who wrote an article in the British Medical Journal (BMJ 2010; 341:c6979) called “Integrative medicine and the point of credulity.”  McLachlan proposed that integrative medicine should not be used as a way of smuggling alternative practices into rational medicine by way of lowered standards of critical thinking. He worries that failure to detect an obvious hoax is not an encouraging sign.

The author, upon seeing a request for presenters at an integrative medicine conference in Jerusalem, submits a paper posing as an embryologist who discovered a new version of reflexology. He explains that he has identified a homunculus represented in the human body, over the area of the buttocks. The homunculus being inverted, such that the head is represented in the inferior position.  As with reflexology, the “map” responds to needling, as in acupuncture, and to gentle suction, such as cupping.

He stops short of telling the conference organizers he has discovered a system whereby the head is up the ass and responds to needles.  Funny, right?  Well, after submission of an abstract with some sciency sounding references, the proposal gets accepted for presentation.  The author declines to present and, instead, publishes the correspondence in the BMJ.

Now, I’m all for having a good laugh at the expense of wacko alternative medicine practices but my goal is clear — I want to help clean up the field in order to highlight the people who are actually doing some good, honest, logical research.  I actually have a problem with what Dr. McLachlan has done.  By poking fun from a distance and walking away without letting the conference organizers in on the joke, the author misses a huge opportunity to educate and possibly improve that which he criticizes. It would have been far better if he accepted a slot at the conference and awaited to see if people would point out the errors in his “research” or simply used the platform to show what bad science is.

The only thing that makes him not a 100 percent coward is that he published his story. Someone who asks difficult questions so that when you answer incorrectly you will learn is called a teacher.   To ask difficult questions and then tell your friends how stupid someone is without letting them in on where their error was is called by a different name entirely.

Remember Smith’s article about how parachutes aren’t evidence based? That one is funny and brilliantly illustrates its point. This article, while funny with its head-up-ones-ass ha ha I get it humor, is really only about as funny as watching your kids get their math homework wrong and, instead of helping them, you call all of your friends and laugh at your kids’ ignorance. Nothing was learned. Nothing was improved and we all feel a little bit sick for participating in the joke.

Yes, it was a hoax but science relies on some degree of honesty and trust.  It is impossible for one scientist to be at the apex of all fields and know all that is known from every discipline.  Isn’t that why we have specialists?  Could it be that the scientific committee accepted McLachlan’s proposal simply in order to learn whether or not this revolutionary discovery was plausible or bunk?  Unlikely, but possible.  Today, I would rather lend the benefit of the doubt to the conference organizers rather than the scientific playground bully.

 

Brett L. Kinsler is a chiropractor in Rochester, NY who writes the RochesterChiro blog and produces the podcast On The Other Hand.

 

Not All Apples Keep the Doctor Away

Those of us in healthcare often can’t help but follow distressing trends. One of these trends indicates that as the nutritional science recommendations for fruits and vegetables increases, Americans inexplicably seem to consume less of these important foods.  It’s like we are a bunch of rebellious teens trying to do the opposite of what our parents tell us. But how bad is it? According to the CDC’s Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (big brother, anyone?), of adults surveyed only 32.5% ate 2 or more fruits a day in 2009 and only 26.3 % ate 3 or more vegetables a day.  Despite millions of dollars spent in marketing, fruit consumption in the US fell by almost 2% from 2000 to 2009 while vegetable consumption remained unchanged.  It should be noted that Idaho was the only state that showed a slight increase in both fruit and vegetable consumption while 10 states (who shall remain nameless) showed a decrease.  So chances are unless you live in Idaho, you are eating no better than you did in 2000 — which was probably not so good to begin with.

Sure, it can be hard to eat all those fruits and vegetables. Every day.  But there is some good news:  Last year, the relative healthiness of apples was studied in the form of phenolic profiles and antioxidant properties of apple skin extracts. Plant phenols include such beneficial compounds as cinnamic acids, benzoic acids, flavonoids, proanthocyanidins, stilbenes, coumarins, lignans and lignins. These are strong antioxidants and might prevent oxidative damage to DNA, lipids and proteins and therefore reduce the likelihood of developing things like cancer and cardiovascular disease.  So if you eat the right apples, you don’t have to eat as many to get the antioxidant benefits.  In the United States, apples alone account for 22% of our phenolic intake, we would do well to be choosy about those apples.

Which apple should we be eating?  Crabapples ranked highest with approximately 2.5 times the benefit as the lowest ranking apples, the golden nugget and the macintosh.  Also very near the bottom were the gala and the empire.  Firmly in the midrange were the granny smith, honeycrisp, and red delicious.  The top ranking palatable apple was the ……Idared.  Idareds showed twice the benefit as the ‘losers’.  A recent trip to a popular local grocery store revealed not one single solitary Idared in sight.  However, there were plenty of conveniently pre-bagged ‘mini-macs’.  Resist the temptation. Bag yourself a few honeycrisps or granny smiths and you will get nearly fifty percent more benefit for the same amount of apple.  If you are lucky enough to find an Idared, even better. Remember, the study measured the relative amounts in apple skin so making applesauce or juice doesn’t count!  How do ya like them apples?

 

Dr. Michalene Elliott & Dr. Brett Kinsler are apple-loving Rochester NY chiropractors.

Arrgh, Fake Number!

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Do you remember that Seinfeld episode when Elaine admits to giving a fake telephone number to guys she meets but doesn’t want to date? The purpose, of course, is it allows her to avoid a confrontation either at the time of the initial meeting or on the phone later during which she would need to tell the prospective suitor she is not interested.  Instead of dealing with the real issue honestly and head on, she manufacturers a piece of false evidence so she can avoid dealing with the real problem.

The other day I received in the mail something that looked like a new chiropractic research journal. With a traditional medical journal type cover, there was no flash, no pictures, just a listing of the articles inside and their authors. The journal was entitled, “The Industry Compendium of Chiropractic Research” vol 56, no. 9.

Hell, I was impressed. How did I not hear that a new chiropractic journal was started, produced so slickly and mailed to chiropractors who hadn’t even paid for subscriptions? I have also been hearing how difficult and expensive it can be to keep a print journal afloat and how many medical journals are finding it necessary to move to electronic, on-line only versions.

Something wasn’t quite right.

The smaller print on the cover of this “journal” said, “Supplement to Chiropractic Economics,” a trade magazine known for glossy ads and fluffy articles. Everything changes once the Compendium is actually opened. Just about every article, some of which are lacking authors names, all of which are lacking statements of funding support, is followed by an advertisement for the very product discussed in the article.

A topical analgesic does well in a clinical trial, there follows an ad for that analgesic. Next, an article on the efficacy of a nutritional supplement followed by an ad for that nutritional supplement. In all, it was insulting that the word “research” was placed on the cover. Worse yet, there are a lot of people in chiropractic who will mistake this magazine for actual, high-quality research.

There is a significant body of research attributable to the chiropractic profession but there is much more that needs to be accomplished. Currently, there is a lack of financial resources and a shortage of qualified individuals necessary to carry forth the work. The fact that a trade publication, Chiropractic Economics, is interested in advancing the body of research within chiropractic is noble and welcomed. They could make a donation to private researchers, develop an award for research, support fellowships or one of a thousand other ways they could actually advance research within the profession. Like Elaine and her fake phone numbers, Chiro Eco’s fake journal avoids dealing with the problem head on and instead, they produced a fake research journal in the hopes of advancing their vendor’s agendas at the expense of intellectual honesty and impartiality.

Dr. Brett L. Kinsler is a chiropractor in Rochester, NY who had to look up the word compendium and finds it ludicrous it appears on the cover of this catalog.

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